The seas around the Mull of Galloway are renowned for the variety of species that can be caught by sea anglers. There are some 60 species avaialble to the species hunter if they know where to look.

THE BANKS

If you check on the charts a few miles out from Port Logan, you will see a series of contour lines that meander in and out but remain roughly parallel to the shoreline. These are known locally as "the banks". Everyone that fishes the area regularly has their favourite mark but anywhere from ninety to one hundred and fifty feet can produce some amazing fishing. Neep tides  have been selected for the event, enabling anchoring at all stages of the tide but you may need one pound of lead at times. Tactics is key to making the most off your session. Large mackerel baits will produce tope, catshark, huss, spurs and even the occasional common skate.


With the big baits down, a second rod with smaller hooks can be very productive. Large shoals of cod, haddock, whiting and all three gurnards frequent the banks. Sometimes drifting around features like drop offs during the slack waters can encourage bites.
Thornback, cuckoo, spotted, blonde rays and smoothound are caught on the banks but not in huge numbers. Its worthwhile trying small traces as well as dabs, pout and short spined sea scorpion are frequent captures.



SANDY BAYS

Dabs, flounders and plaice can appear from anywhere but the highest concentrations are in the sandy bays, Ardwell, Port Logan and Clanyard Bay. These bays may also produce dragonets and a variety of gurnards. A slow drift four to eight hundred yards off Clanyard Bay can produce small thornback and spotted rays and even small turbot and brill appear regularly.


Port Logan

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Drifting around all day with baited feathers will produce ten to twelve species but to get that number into the high teens you wil need to focus on three main target areas.



CLIFF MARKS

These are stacked with fish and could produce half your species tally. Look for features just a few yards offshore in the thirty to forty feet range. Drifting with single baits/shads etc. will produce the biggest pollack and coalfish but consider anchoring for multiple species. Plentiful in most areas are ballan, corkwing, cuckoo, goldsinny and rock cook wrasse. Ragworm is the most consistent for wrasse although the smaller varieties will take fish or lugworm baits. The same tactics used for wrasse may also produce poor cod, pouting, shannies and blenny's. Big mackerel baits are used to attract conger and smaller fish baits may produce various small ling species.
LUCE BAY    
Most of Luce Bay and certainly north of Drummore is shallow and sandy. During the summer months, the water temperature is up to 4 degrees higher than the waters around the Mull of Galloway and Port Logan. This difference in temperature gives rise to a few different species from those found of Port Logan. The tides are much smaller in the northern part of the bay so light leads and light rods are used extensively.    
ARDWELL REEF

Ardwell reef is one of the most fished marks in the bay. There is a reef that runs offshore from Ardwell Village to about a mile out to sea. The Seaward side has a drop off which the shark species use for navigation. Packs of small tope are commonly caught as well as big numbers of smoothound and thornback rays, lesser spotted catsharks and Huss. Small baits will catch three types of gurnard, whiting and the occasional flattie. Scad are often caught on the feathers.


EAST TARBERT BAY CLIFF MARKS

East Tarbert Bay is a small bay just north of the lighthouse. These cliff marks have species that can't be found anywhere else in the bay and are stacked with fish. This area could easily produce half your species tally. Look for features just a few yards offshore in the twenty to thirty feet range. Drifting with single baits/shads etc will produce small pollack and coalfish but consider anchoring for multiple species. On offer are ballan, corkwing, cuckoo, goldsinny and rock cook wrasse. Ragworm is the most consistent for wrasse and the smaller varieties will take fish or lugworm baits. The same tactics used for wrasse may also produce poor cod, pouting, shannies and blenny's. Big mackerel baits are used to attract conger and smaller fish baits may produce various small ling species.
A drift forty yards parallel to the shore can produce mackerel, all three gurnard, plaice and dabs, dragonets and codling.
Larger pollack can be sought the other side of the lighthouse but ask for advice if you don't know these waters. Small boats get into trouble every year here because of riptides.


​SHORE BASS

Shore anglers catch good numbers of bass from Drummore to Sandhead. These can be picked up on the boats if they are prepared to spin or trawl lures in shallow water.


JOCK'S POINT


Jock's Point is the reef south of New England bay and has some surprising drop offs on the north and east approximately 400 yards offshore. Many of the wrasses can be found here as well as small pollack and conger. Bream are caught around the fringes and also on boulder banks in the region.


 
​​​​DRUMMORE DROP OFF

The mark known as "Drummore drop off" is caused by a huge kelp ridden reef that runs over one mile out from the shore before turning south. Wherever the reef ends, it drops twenty feet onto sand. This feature runs for two miles and anywhere on the “drop off” can produce some amazing fishing. The reef is famous for its large female tope but large rays, huss, lesser spotted catsharks and smoothound are frequent visitors. The usual three gurnards, dabs, and whiting will show.
A drift right on top of reef, sometimes in twenty feet (at low water) will produce pollack and coalfish and even a six pound red cod might show.